WORKSHOP 4: RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT


Aims of workshop:

  • Understand the importance of building and maintaining developmental network (DN) for personal and career success
  • Understand your cultural intelligence, identify gaps and develop a plan of action. • Discuss Mock Assessment Centre presentation

Workshop 4 will focus on 3 activities:

  • Complete DN online diagnostic and reflect on results and its relevance (40 mins)
  • Complete Cultural intelligence and reflect on its results and its relevance profile (45 mins) • Briefing on Mock Assessment Centre presentations (20-30 mins)

ACTIVITY 4.1: DEVELOPMENTAL NETWORK DIAGNOSTIC FEEDBACK

Tutor input (10 mins)

Everybody needs someone in their life to help them achieve their potential. Having the right developers in your life and career is crucial to enhancing your career success. Indeed, the more developers you know the better success you will have in your career and professional life. Your developers therefore DRIVE you to success through the following:

Direction

Resources

Inspiration

Visibility

Employability = Career Success™ (Emmanuel, 2017)

Direction – Developers can help to navigate your career by giving you a sense of direction. These people can help you explore and identify career opportunities that you may not have considered on your own. They may also help you to get out of your comfort zone, set challenging goals and remain focussed.

Resources – Your developers may have particular skills, education or experience that they have developed over many years. Your developers can be a valuable source of information and ideas that will give you further career or professional insights. They can also provide you with the emotional support and encouragement you need in difficult times.

Inspiration – Who inspires you? Like a mentor, your developers can be sources of inspiration. They can help to motivate you, enable you to make improvements and move forward in your life. Having someone that you can look up to, as a role model, will help to energise you, stimulate you and encourage you to become the person you want to be.

Visibility – Your developer may connect you to other people who have the right expertise, resources and influences to help with your career success and improve the quality of your life. These connections can help you to get a foot in the door of your chosen career, profession or business.

Employability – Increasing your employment prospects is even more essential in this current and uncertain economic climate. Your developers can help you develop the right skills to improve your career or business prospects. The role your developers play in helping you become more employable cannot be underestimated. They can also help you to get the job or career of you want.

Direction + Resources + Inspiration + Visibility + Employability = Career Success.

In sum, a network of developers helps DRIVE you to achieve a greater sense of purpose, locate the right resources and the right connections and develop the right skills and competences to enhance your employability.

Source: (Emmanuel, 2017 – Developmental network questionnaire and diagnostic tool)

Individual activity (20 mins)

On you own jot down your responses to the following 4 questions:

  1. In your learning sets share your personal analysis report. Can you identify any trends across the group and any individual issues for further analysis?
  2. Thinking about your future career goals, who in your current developmental network could help you get there and what help is missing?
  3. What is your key take-away from assessing your developmental network?
  4. What will you do differently following this session?

Group activity (10 mins)

In your learning sets discuss your response to the above four questions.

Further reading on developmental networks:

Murphy W. (2016) How Women (and Men) Can Find Role Models When None Are Obvious in Harvard Business Review June 1 2016 accessed online https://hbr.org/2016/06/how-women-andmen-can-find-role-models-when-none-are-obvious

Please read Telegraph (June 2016) article via this link: How to work a room: 10 tips to networking success

Also, read the British Council’s survey report: ‘Culture at work: The value of intercultural skills at work’ via this link.

ACTIVITY 4.2: DEVELOPING CULTURAL INTELIGENCE (CQ)

Tutor input (10 mins)

We have already discussed, in a previous lecture, the importance of cultural intelligence as a way of enhancing our multiple intelligences. CQ therefore builds on earlier concepts such as IQ and EQ and allows us to be open to new experiences, being more informed about what we might encounter in a cross-cultural setting and be more attune to dealing with culture shock – i.e. feeling a sense of disorientation when we encounter new or different situations (See Bucher, 2007).

You may have a higher IQ or EQ but this is not sufficient as employers need workers with CQ in order to adjust to changing nature of today’s work environment.

At times you may experience a culture shock as a result of being cut off from your familiar culture, environment and norms: For instance:

International student

How did you feel when you first arrived in this country to study at UoG?

or

Home student

How did you feel when you arrived during the first week of studies at UoG?

Because we can appreciate multiple perspectives and make appropriate adjustments we are able to quickly adjust and relate to others whose backgrounds are not the same as ours.

How culturally intelligent are you?

The way we relate to others affects how they relate to us. For example, we might be surprised by a negative reaction we get from people because our perceptions do not align with theirs. What is your interpretation of the two scenarios below?

Scenario one

Consider an everyday situation in which a customer pays in cash for a purchase. The cashier reaches out for the money but the customer places it on the counter. What do you think the cashier might read into this?

  1. Absolutely nothing.
  2. The customer showed a lack of respect by not placing the money in the cashier’s hand.
  3. The customer did not place money in the cashier’s hand for religious or cultural reasons.
  4. Any of the above.

Scenario two

Consider the following scenario

A human resource manager of a manufacturing company (from the UK) sits in her office. She is interviewing candidates for factory work, and the next candidate is due. Suddenly the door opens, and a young man of African heritage walks in without knocking. He does not look at the manager but walks to the nearest chair and, without waiting to be invited, sits down. He makes no eye contact with the manager but instead stares at the floor. The manager is appalled at such graceless behaviour. Can’t the man even say “Good morning”? The interview has not even started, and even though the jobs being filled do not require strong social skills, it is already unlikely that the young man will be appointed.

Successful managers in today’s workplace will be those with well-developed interpersonal skills such as the ability to manage their emotions and accept feedback from others. This is all part of developing EI and CQ and it is certainly high on the agenda of organisations in terms of skills (attributes) sought.

Intercultural failures

According to Thomas and Inkson (2009), we fail interculturally in various ways:

  • Being unaware of the key features and biases of our own culture.
  • Feeling threatened or uneasy when interacting with people who are culturally different.
  • Being unable to understand or explain the behaviour of others who are culturally different.
  • Being unable to transfer knowledge about one culture to another culture.
  • Not recognizing when our own cultural orientation is influencing our behaviour.
  • Being unable to adjust to living and working in another culture.
  • Being unable to develop long-term interpersonal relationships with people from other cultures

Source:

Bucher, R.D. (2007) Building Cultural Intelligence (CQ): Nine Mega Skills, Prentice Hall, USA, (ISBN13:

9780131738959)

David C. T. & Inkson, K.C. (2017) Cultural Intelligence: Surviving and Thriving in the Global Village, 3rd Ed, BerrettKoehler Publishers

Individual activity (10 mins)

CQ Self-Assessment Questionnaire Below you can find the 12 items defined by Early and Mosakowski [1] and reproduced by John Abele (retrieved March 1 2016). Rate the extent to which you agree with each statement, using the scale: 1=strongly disagree, 2=disagree, 3=neutral, 4=agree, 5= strongly agree _____________________________________________________________________________________ Cognitive CQ _____ Before I interact with people from a new culture, I ask myself what I hope to achieve. _____ If I encounter something unexpected while working in a new culture, I use this experience to figure out new ways to approach other cultures in the future. _____ I plan how I am going to relate to people from a different culture before I meet them. _____ When I come in to a new cultural situation, I can immediately sense whether something is going well or something is going wrong. Total_____ /4 = ____ Cognitive CQ Physical CQ _____ It is easy for me to change my body language (for example, eye contact or posture) to suit people from a different culture. _____ I can alter my expression when a cultural encounter requires it. _____ I modify my speech style (for example, accent or tone) to suit people from a different culture. _____ I easily change the way I act when a cross-cultural encounter seems to require it. Total_____/4= ____ Physical CQ ______________________________________________________________________________________ Motivational /Emotional CQ _____ I have confidence that I can deal well with people from a different culture. _____ I am certain that I can befriend people whose cultural backgrounds are different from mine. _____ I can adapt to the lifestyle of a different culture with relative ease. _____ I am confident that I can deal with a cultural situation that is unfamiliar. Total_____/4=____ Motivational/emotional CQ In this quiz the closer to 5 your average score is the higher your CQ. References: Earley, P. C., & Mosakowski, E. (2004). Cultural intelligence. Harvard business review, 82(10), 139-146. Retrieved from: http://edutechwiki.unige.ch/mediawiki/index.php?title=Cultural_competence/cultural_intelligence_self-assessment&oldid=57771

On your CQ self-assessment:

Group activity (10 mins)

In your learning sets discuss:

What do you think is the most effective way for you to develop cultural intelligence? Why?

Individual activity (15 mins)

  1. Consider your CQ results. Complete the table below noting your areas of strength, areas needing attention and your development priority.
Areas of strengthAreas needing attentionDevelopment Priority
  1. Identify one or two actions you can take immediately to strengthen your cultural intelligence.
  2. What is the one specific thing you can do on a regular basis to take responsibility for your personal growth in the area of cultural diversity?

Here are some additional resources on CQ:

Watch TedEx video on CQ by Julia Middlelton CEO and founder of Common Purpose via this link:

Shorter version of video (14 mins) http://commonpurpose.org/blog/archive/julia-middleton-talks-culturalintelligence-at-tedxeastend/

ACTIVITY 4.3: MOCK ASSESSMENT CENTRE PRESENTATION BRIEFING

Take 20-30 minutes as a group to go over this with your tutor.

Your Mock Assessment Centre presentation will be held on Tuesday 26th November for Meantime groups and on Thursday 28th November for Meridian groups. The presentations will be held in your usual seminar rooms (unless otherwise stated).

You and your learning set will be required to deliver a 10-minute team presentation, in a given time slot, to external guests from a friendly employer.

This type of exercise is common in assessment centres. Other assessment centre exercises are likely to include psychometric testing (e.g. verbal and non-verbal reasoning tests), interviews and role-plays. The team presentation, to a brief given at short notice, is designed specifically to test candidates’ leadership, team-working, communication, research, creativity and problem-solving skills. It also tests candidates’ ability to work under pressure.

Presentation Brief:

The exact brief will be released exactly two weeks before ‘The Boardroom Project’ presentations. This gives all students ample time to prepare, although under some time pressure. (In case you think this is unfair or tough, normally in assessment centres you are only given an hour to research and prepare your presentation!).

Your team will have 10 minutes maximum in which to present your research and creative ideas. You are to use a maximum of 5 PowerPoint slides. You are required to use a USB memory stick (no downloading of slides from the internet or your network account on the day please). The first slide must contain your team members’ names and ID numbers. You must reproduce your slides in Part 3 of your Portfolio (see below 5.4). Your team will be expected to take questions after the presentation.

You are expected to dress smartly.

Presentation slot:

Your date, room and time slot for ‘The Boardroom Project’ presentations will also be published on Moodle. Presentations will take place one team at a time, using the normal tutorial rooms, at 15minute intervals. On the day itself, please arrive 10 minutes before your scheduled time and wait quietly outside your classroom until you are invited in.

Presentation Feedback:

Our guest colleagues will give some immediate verbal feedback after your presentation. Each team member will also receive written feedback for inclusion in Part 3 of your Portfolio (see below 5.4). This will be distributed before the end of term (see below 5.4).

Prize-giving:

Our guest colleagues will be providing the written feedback and awarding prizes to the best presentations. The prize-giving event will take place at the beginning of Term 2, and details will be confirmed by the module leader.

Recap and Preparation for Workshop 5: ° How well developed is your CV in its multiple versions? Do you need more advice on it e.g. from ECS? ° Take a look at the materials for the Workshop 5 on interviews. Do some background research on the effectiveness of selection interviewing (see human resource management textbooks). ° Thoroughly and carefully read the Mock Interview guidelines on the next page to assist you in preparing for your Mock Interview, ° Remember, you will become confident about interviews when you are competent so PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE!

WORKSHOP 5: INTERVIEW ROLE PLAYS

We all need continual practice in interview technique. It helps to understand all aspects of the interview process, from both the interviewer and interviewee perspective. Nowadays there is a huge volume of examples of best practice interviews on the internet, on websites such as YouTube. As ever, however, be a critical and discerning customer of internet-based sources. There is also a substantial amount of published research on the effectiveness of selection interviews and best practice in interviews (see any HRM textbook).

In this workshop, we will perform a mock interview exercise and you will then need to write a critical reflection of this for Part 3 of the Portfolio.

Aims of workshop

  • understand interview process from interview, interviewee perspectives
  • gain an insight into best practice in selection interviews
  • critically discuss the effectiveness of selection interviewing
  • review requirements for Part 3 of the Portfolio

In Workshop 5, we will be doing 4 activities:

  • mock interviews (70 mins)
  • discussion of interview effectiveness (10 mins)
  • briefing for mock assessment centre (The Boardroom Project) (10 mins)  review of requirements for Part 3 of the Portfolio (10 mins)

ACTIVITY 5.1: MOCK INTERVIEWS

(70 mins)

Review the job spec (10 mins)In your learning sets, first of all review one the graduate job ads from Workshop 3 or an alternative agreed with your tutor. Agree the main requirements of the role.

Agree roles and prepare for the first interview (15 mins): One learning set member will be the interviewer, and another will the interviewee. The interview will last for 5 minutes only. The interviewer will select questions from the list overleaf, without the interviewee knowing in advance which questions will be selected. The third member will act as observer, taking notes to then provide feedback to both the interviewer and interviewer (using the form overleaf on page 56). Be sure to get into role! This means setting up the interview ‘room’ appropriately as best you can, acting out the meeting and greeting at the start of the interview, and seeing the candidate out of the room at the end of the interview.

Role-play the first interview with post-interview feedback from the observer (15 mins):

Repeat the mock interview twice, rotating roles (30 mins)Rotate the rolesso that all members of the learning set get to play interviewer, interviewee and observer.

Possible interview questions

*NOTE: a question on dissertation / management report is required for everyone*

Education

  1. Tell me about your education background: why did you decide to study BA Business

Management/HRM/

Psychology?

  1. What is your research topic for your dissertation / management report and how is it relevant for the job you apply for?
  2. How is the process going? Are you ‘in control’ of the process of doing research and writing the dissertation / management report?
  3. Did you undertake a placement year? How is this experience relevant for the job you apply for?
  4. If you did not do a placement: what evidence could you provide of skills that you have gained from other work experiences?
  5. Are you planning any further study/training after you have graduated? Why/Why not?
  6. Which skills do you most need to develop further? How do you generally plan to do this?

Previous Work Experience

  1. Can you give me a brief summary of your work history to date?
  2. What were the exact responsibilities you had in each of these jobs?
  3. Can you give an example of where you have needed to provide leadership in a team?
  4. Tell me about when you witnessed conflict in a work or team environment? What was your role and how was the situation resolved?
  5. Give an example where you have taken responsibility for a difficult task.
  6. Describe an incident in which your action was critical for the solution of the problem.
  7. Give examples of your communication skills and how you have used and developed them in practice.

Current Application

  1. Why have you applied for this post?
  2. Why do you want to work for this company?
  3. What specific skills/competences do you have for this job?
  4. Why do you want this job?
  5. How do you see your career development in the long-term?
  6. What do you see as the next step in your career?
  7. What is your ideal job?
  8. Why should we offer you this position?
  9. Why do you want to change jobs?
  10. Describe an example where you have utilised your communication skills to handle a difficult customer (or co- worker, team member, etc.)?

Personal

  1. Describe how you would adapt to new situations, people, workplaces and ways of working?
  2. Give an example of your experience as a team player and how you have handled group conflicts.
  3. Give an example of how you approach new challenges.
  4. Give an example where you have led a team to reach a group objective and demonstrated your leadership skills.
  5. What are your main strengths and weaknesses?
  6. What is your greatest achievement to date?
  7. Give an example where you have provided good customer service (or team work).

Observer Role

As an observer attempt to observe the following in the interview:

  • information: how relevant is the information provided from both sides – interviewer and interviewer
  • are the questions leading or do they open up the potential for a proper dialogue?
  • How much are both sides willing and able to listen?

Other aspects that may be observed:

  • gestures and the way people sit opposite from each other
  • clarity of speech and appropriateness of answering: not too long and not too short
  • referring back to other information provided in the interview and linking skills with experiences Observer’s notes
Observer:
Interviewer:
Candidate:

Write some specific comments that will be useful for improvement and reinforcement – at least one positive (+) and one change, or delta ( )

Please tick box (5 = Excellent; 4 = Good; 3 = Average/Fair; 2 = needs improvement; 1 = poor).

General appearance, punctuality & presentation54321
Listening and answering skills (how much evidence provided and preparedness to address questions adequately)54321
Understanding of job role(interpretation of the job description and tasks required)54321
Suitability to job role (ability to link previous/existing experience to job role)54321
Level of competency-based answers (ability to understand question, give clear structured examples)54321
Level of responding to abstract questions (e.g. strengths, weaknesses, why should we recruit you? Etc.)54321
Awareness of and evidence of research on company culture and sector54321
Gestures, non-verbal signs and actions showing suitable attitude (e.g. avoiding irritating noises and movements)54321
Clarity of answers (tone, level, clarity)54321
Closing of interview: final question by interviewee54321

ACTIVITY 5.2: DISCUSSION OF INTERVIEW EFFECTIVENESS

An interesting dilemma about selection interviewing is that is relatively ineffective as a selection tool (i.e. as a predictor of the performance of the candidate in the job role), yet it continues to be used pervasively in organisations. Below is a summary of the main lessons gained from academic research about the reasons for widespread ineffectiveness and bad practice in selection interviewing.

Source: Bratton, J. and J. Gold (1999), Human Resource Management: Theory and Practice, 2nd Edition, Basingstoke: Macmillan (p.204).

As a group, discuss the following questions (10 mins):

1.How useful has this mock interview exercise been for you personally as a soon-to-be graduate jobseeker? What are the main lessons you have learnt about best practice as an interviewee and as an interviewer?

In general, how effective are interviews for both the candidate, and for the employer?

Tips for answering interview questions:

Remember to use the STAR framework:

Situation: Explain the situation

Task: Explain your task or role

Action: What action did you take?

Results: What resulted from your action?

Additional reading:

You may find this article by Steve Rock (2014) useful graduate jobs on how to stand out in an interview and impress employers.

ACTIVITY 5.3: BRIEFING FOR ‘THE BOARDROOM PROJECT’ (MOCK
ASSESSMENT CENTRE)

Take 10 minutes as a group to go over this with your module tutor.

In the next and final Tutorial session (The Boardroom Project) you and your learning set will be required to deliver a 10-minute team presentation, in a given time slot, to external guests from a friendly employer.

This type of exercise is common in assessment centres. Other assessment centre exercises are likely to include psychometric testing (e.g. verbal and non-verbal reasoning tests), interviews and role-plays. The team presentation, to a brief given at short notice, is designed specifically to test candidates’ leadership, team-working, communication, research, creativity and problem-solving skills. It also tests candidates’ ability to work under pressure.

Presentation Brief:

The exact brief will be released exactly two weeks before ‘The Boardroom Project’ presentations. This gives all students ample time to prepare, although under some time pressure. (In case you think this is unfair or tough, normally in assessment centres you are only given an hour to research and prepare your presentation!).

Your team will have 10 minutes maximum in which to present your research and creative ideas. You are to use a maximum of 5 PowerPoint slides. You are required to use a USB memory stick (no downloading of slides from the internet or your network account on the day please). The first slide must contain your team members’ names and ID numbers. You must reproduce your slides in Part 3 of your Portfolio (see below 5.4). Your team will be expected to take questions after the presentation. You are expected to dress smartly.

Presentation slot:

Your date, room and time slot for The Boardroom Project will also be published on Moodle. Presentations will take place one team at a time, using the normal tutorial rooms, at 15-minute intervals. On the day itself, please arrive 10 minutes before your scheduled time and wait quietly outside your classroom until you are invited in.

Presentation Feedback:

Our guest colleagues will give some immediate verbal feedback after your presentation. Each team member will also receive written feedback for inclusion in Part 3 of your Portfolio (see below 5.4). This will be distributed before the end of term (see below 5.4).

Prize-giving:

Our guest colleagues will be providing the written feedback and awarding prizes to the best presentations. The prize-giving event will take place at the beginning of Term 2, and details will be confirmed by the module leader.

ACTIVITY 5.4: REQUIREMENTS FOR PART 3 OF THE PORTFOLIO

Below are the requirements for Part 3 of the Portfolio, with some additional guidance in italics.

Based on the activities from Workshops 3, 4 and 5, discuss as a group what has been learned and what more needs to be done in order to address the requirements of Part 3. (10 mins)

Part 3: Job Search Activity (approx. 1000 words)

  • My SMART future career plan
    1. Reflect on how you would manage your job searching efforts and strategy and produce a SMART career plan that includes your short, medium and long-term goals over the next 5 years. You might want to use the template overleaf. (There is extensive literature on job search that you could use in support of your reflection).
  • (Mock) job application (Letter of application and Curriculum Vitae for a real vacancy)
    1. The job you apply for should link with your industry research in Part 1.
    2. Reproduce the job ad in the portfolio, citing its source, along with the LOA/personal statement and CV. You will need to provide evidence showing that a professional has reviewed and commented on at least one of these documents).
  • Reflection on (mock) interview (3 interviews, reflection on roles as interviewee, interviewer and observer, and how feedback was given to one another)
    1. Reflect on the experience of being an interviewer, interviewee and observer, and in particular on giving and receiving feedback. How did feel? What did you learn about your own interview technique? How useful was it to play the three roles?
    2. More generally, what did you learn about best practice in interviewing and the effectiveness of selection interviews? And what did you learn about giving and receiving feedback?(There is substantial academic literature on these questions, which you should refer to and cite).
  • Reflection on (mock) assessment centre
  • What did you learn from the experience of working with others, researching, preparing and delivering the mock assessment centre? What were the main points of feedback you received from the panel?
  • Include the written feedback and your slides in the Portfolio (as appendices if you wish).

Aims of workshop:

  • Understand the importance of building and maintaining developmental network (DN) for personal and career success
  • Understand your cultural intelligence, identify gaps and develop a plan of action. • Discuss Mock Assessment Centre presentation

Workshop 4 will focus on 3 activities:

  • Complete DN online diagnostic and reflect on results and its relevance (40 mins)
  • Complete Cultural intelligence and reflect on its results and its relevance profile (45 mins) • Briefing on Mock Assessment Centre presentations (20-30 mins)

ACTIVITY 4.1: DEVELOPMENTAL NETWORK DIAGNOSTIC FEEDBACK

Tutor input (10 mins)

Everybody needs someone in their life to help them achieve their potential. Having the right developers in your life and career is crucial to enhancing your career success. Indeed, the more developers you know the better success you will have in your career and professional life. Your developers therefore DRIVE you to success through the following:

Direction

Resources

Inspiration

Visibility

Employability = Career Success™ (Emmanuel, 2017)

Direction – Developers can help to navigate your career by giving you a sense of direction. These people can help you explore and identify career opportunities that you may not have considered on your own. They may also help you to get out of your comfort zone, set challenging goals and remain focussed.

Resources – Your developers may have particular skills, education or experience that they have developed over many years. Your developers can be a valuable source of information and ideas that will give you further career or professional insights. They can also provide you with the emotional support and encouragement you need in difficult times.

Inspiration – Who inspires you? Like a mentor, your developers can be sources of inspiration. They can help to motivate you, enable you to make improvements and move forward in your life. Having someone that you can look up to, as a role model, will help to energise you, stimulate you and encourage you to become the person you want to be.

Visibility – Your developer may connect you to other people who have the right expertise, resources and influences to help with your career success and improve the quality of your life. These connections can help you to get a foot in the door of your chosen career, profession or business.

Employability – Increasing your employment prospects is even more essential in this current and uncertain economic climate. Your developers can help you develop the right skills to improve your career or business prospects. The role your developers play in helping you become more employable cannot be underestimated. They can also help you to get the job or career of you want.

Direction + Resources + Inspiration + Visibility + Employability = Career Success.

In sum, a network of developers helps DRIVE you to achieve a greater sense of purpose, locate the right resources and the right connections and develop the right skills and competences to enhance your employability.

Source: (Emmanuel, 2017 – Developmental network questionnaire and diagnostic tool)

Individual activity (20 mins)

On you own jot down your responses to the following 4 questions:

  1. In your learning sets share your personal analysis report. Can you identify any trends across the group and any individual issues for further analysis?
  2. Thinking about your future career goals, who in your current developmental network could help you get there and what help is missing?
  3. What is your key take-away from assessing your developmental network?
  4. What will you do differently following this session?

Group activity (10 mins)

In your learning sets discuss your response to the above four questions.

Further reading on developmental networks:

Murphy W. (2016) How Women (and Men) Can Find Role Models When None Are Obvious in Harvard Business Review June 1 2016 accessed online https://hbr.org/2016/06/how-women-andmen-can-find-role-models-when-none-are-obvious

Please read Telegraph (June 2016) article via this link: How to work a room: 10 tips to networking success

Also, read the British Council’s survey report: ‘Culture at work: The value of intercultural skills at work’ via this link.

ACTIVITY 4.2: DEVELOPING CULTURAL INTELIGENCE (CQ)

Tutor input (10 mins)

We have already discussed, in a previous lecture, the importance of cultural intelligence as a way of enhancing our multiple intelligences. CQ therefore builds on earlier concepts such as IQ and EQ and allows us to be open to new experiences, being more informed about what we might encounter in a cross-cultural setting and be more attune to dealing with culture shock – i.e. feeling a sense of disorientation when we encounter new or different situations (See Bucher, 2007).

You may have a higher IQ or EQ but this is not sufficient as employers need workers with CQ in order to adjust to changing nature of today’s work environment.

At times you may experience a culture shock as a result of being cut off from your familiar culture, environment and norms: For instance:

International student

How did you feel when you first arrived in this country to study at UoG?

or

Home student

How did you feel when you arrived during the first week of studies at UoG?

Because we can appreciate multiple perspectives and make appropriate adjustments we are able to quickly adjust and relate to others whose backgrounds are not the same as ours.

How culturally intelligent are you?

The way we relate to others affects how they relate to us. For example, we might be surprised by a negative reaction we get from people because our perceptions do not align with theirs. What is your interpretation of the two scenarios below?

Scenario one

Consider an everyday situation in which a customer pays in cash for a purchase. The cashier reaches out for the money but the customer places it on the counter. What do you think the cashier might read into this?

  1. Absolutely nothing.
  2. The customer showed a lack of respect by not placing the money in the cashier’s hand.
  3. The customer did not place money in the cashier’s hand for religious or cultural reasons.
  4. Any of the above.

Scenario two

Consider the following scenario

A human resource manager of a manufacturing company (from the UK) sits in her office. She is interviewing candidates for factory work, and the next candidate is due. Suddenly the door opens, and a young man of African heritage walks in without knocking. He does not look at the manager but walks to the nearest chair and, without waiting to be invited, sits down. He makes no eye contact with the manager but instead stares at the floor. The manager is appalled at such graceless behaviour. Can’t the man even say “Good morning”? The interview has not even started, and even though the jobs being filled do not require strong social skills, it is already unlikely that the young man will be appointed.

Successful managers in today’s workplace will be those with well-developed interpersonal skills such as the ability to manage their emotions and accept feedback from others. This is all part of developing EI and CQ and it is certainly high on the agenda of organisations in terms of skills (attributes) sought.

Intercultural failures

According to Thomas and Inkson (2009), we fail interculturally in various ways:

  • Being unaware of the key features and biases of our own culture.
  • Feeling threatened or uneasy when interacting with people who are culturally different.
  • Being unable to understand or explain the behaviour of others who are culturally different.
  • Being unable to transfer knowledge about one culture to another culture.
  • Not recognizing when our own cultural orientation is influencing our behaviour.
  • Being unable to adjust to living and working in another culture.
  • Being unable to develop long-term interpersonal relationships with people from other cultures

Source:

Bucher, R.D. (2007) Building Cultural Intelligence (CQ): Nine Mega Skills, Prentice Hall, USA, (ISBN13:

9780131738959)

David C. T. & Inkson, K.C. (2017) Cultural Intelligence: Surviving and Thriving in the Global Village, 3rd Ed, BerrettKoehler Publishers

Individual activity (10 mins)

CQ Self-Assessment Questionnaire Below you can find the 12 items defined by Early and Mosakowski [1] and reproduced by John Abele (retrieved March 1 2016). Rate the extent to which you agree with each statement, using the scale: 1=strongly disagree, 2=disagree, 3=neutral, 4=agree, 5= strongly agree _____________________________________________________________________________________ Cognitive CQ _____ Before I interact with people from a new culture, I ask myself what I hope to achieve. _____ If I encounter something unexpected while working in a new culture, I use this experience to figure out new ways to approach other cultures in the future. _____ I plan how I am going to relate to people from a different culture before I meet them. _____ When I come in to a new cultural situation, I can immediately sense whether something is going well or something is going wrong. Total_____ /4 = ____ Cognitive CQ Physical CQ _____ It is easy for me to change my body language (for example, eye contact or posture) to suit people from a different culture. _____ I can alter my expression when a cultural encounter requires it. _____ I modify my speech style (for example, accent or tone) to suit people from a different culture. _____ I easily change the way I act when a cross-cultural encounter seems to require it. Total_____/4= ____ Physical CQ ______________________________________________________________________________________ Motivational /Emotional CQ _____ I have confidence that I can deal well with people from a different culture. _____ I am certain that I can befriend people whose cultural backgrounds are different from mine. _____ I can adapt to the lifestyle of a different culture with relative ease. _____ I am confident that I can deal with a cultural situation that is unfamiliar. Total_____/4=____ Motivational/emotional CQ In this quiz the closer to 5 your average score is the higher your CQ. References: Earley, P. C., & Mosakowski, E. (2004). Cultural intelligence. Harvard business review, 82(10), 139-146. Retrieved from: http://edutechwiki.unige.ch/mediawiki/index.php?title=Cultural_competence/cultural_intelligence_self-assessment&oldid=57771

On your CQ self-assessment:

Group activity (10 mins)

In your learning sets discuss:

What do you think is the most effective way for you to develop cultural intelligence? Why?

Individual activity (15 mins)

  1. Consider your CQ results. Complete the table below noting your areas of strength, areas needing attention and your development priority.
Areas of strengthAreas needing attentionDevelopment Priority
  1. Identify one or two actions you can take immediately to strengthen your cultural intelligence.
  2. What is the one specific thing you can do on a regular basis to take responsibility for your personal growth in the area of cultural diversity?

Here are some additional resources on CQ:

Watch TedEx video on CQ by Julia Middlelton CEO and founder of Common Purpose via this link:

Shorter version of video (14 mins) http://commonpurpose.org/blog/archive/julia-middleton-talks-culturalintelligence-at-tedxeastend/

ACTIVITY 4.3: MOCK ASSESSMENT CENTRE PRESENTATION BRIEFING

Take 20-30 minutes as a group to go over this with your tutor.

Your Mock Assessment Centre presentation will be held on Tuesday 26th November for Meantime groups and on Thursday 28th November for Meridian groups. The presentations will be held in your usual seminar rooms (unless otherwise stated).

You and your learning set will be required to deliver a 10-minute team presentation, in a given time slot, to external guests from a friendly employer.

This type of exercise is common in assessment centres. Other assessment centre exercises are likely to include psychometric testing (e.g. verbal and non-verbal reasoning tests), interviews and role-plays. The team presentation, to a brief given at short notice, is designed specifically to test candidates’ leadership, team-working, communication, research, creativity and problem-solving skills. It also tests candidates’ ability to work under pressure.

Presentation Brief:

The exact brief will be released exactly two weeks before ‘The Boardroom Project’ presentations. This gives all students ample time to prepare, although under some time pressure. (In case you think this is unfair or tough, normally in assessment centres you are only given an hour to research and prepare your presentation!).

Your team will have 10 minutes maximum in which to present your research and creative ideas. You are to use a maximum of 5 PowerPoint slides. You are required to use a USB memory stick (no downloading of slides from the internet or your network account on the day please). The first slide must contain your team members’ names and ID numbers. You must reproduce your slides in Part 3 of your Portfolio (see below 5.4). Your team will be expected to take questions after the presentation.

You are expected to dress smartly.

Presentation slot:

Your date, room and time slot for ‘The Boardroom Project’ presentations will also be published on Moodle. Presentations will take place one team at a time, using the normal tutorial rooms, at 15minute intervals. On the day itself, please arrive 10 minutes before your scheduled time and wait quietly outside your classroom until you are invited in.

Presentation Feedback:

Our guest colleagues will give some immediate verbal feedback after your presentation. Each team member will also receive written feedback for inclusion in Part 3 of your Portfolio (see below 5.4). This will be distributed before the end of term (see below 5.4).

Prize-giving:

Our guest colleagues will be providing the written feedback and awarding prizes to the best presentations. The prize-giving event will take place at the beginning of Term 2, and details will be confirmed by the module leader.

Recap and Preparation for Workshop 5: ° How well developed is your CV in its multiple versions? Do you need more advice on it e.g. from ECS? ° Take a look at the materials for the Workshop 5 on interviews. Do some background research on the effectiveness of selection interviewing (see human resource management textbooks). ° Thoroughly and carefully read the Mock Interview guidelines on the next page to assist you in preparing for your Mock Interview, ° Remember, you will become confident about interviews when you are competent so PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE!

WORKSHOP 5: INTERVIEW ROLE PLAYS

We all need continual practice in interview technique. It helps to understand all aspects of the interview process, from both the interviewer and interviewee perspective. Nowadays there is a huge volume of examples of best practice interviews on the internet, on websites such as YouTube. As ever, however, be a critical and discerning customer of internet-based sources. There is also a substantial amount of published research on the effectiveness of selection interviews and best practice in interviews (see any HRM textbook).

In this workshop, we will perform a mock interview exercise and you will then need to write a critical reflection of this for Part 3 of the Portfolio.

Aims of workshop

  • understand interview process from interview, interviewee perspectives
  • gain an insight into best practice in selection interviews
  • critically discuss the effectiveness of selection interviewing
  • review requirements for Part 3 of the Portfolio

In Workshop 5, we will be doing 4 activities:

  • mock interviews (70 mins)
  • discussion of interview effectiveness (10 mins)
  • briefing for mock assessment centre (The Boardroom Project) (10 mins)  review of requirements for Part 3 of the Portfolio (10 mins)

ACTIVITY 5.1: MOCK INTERVIEWS

(70 mins)

Review the job spec (10 mins)In your learning sets, first of all review one the graduate job ads from Workshop 3 or an alternative agreed with your tutor. Agree the main requirements of the role.

Agree roles and prepare for the first interview (15 mins): One learning set member will be the interviewer, and another will the interviewee. The interview will last for 5 minutes only. The interviewer will select questions from the list overleaf, without the interviewee knowing in advance which questions will be selected. The third member will act as observer, taking notes to then provide feedback to both the interviewer and interviewer (using the form overleaf on page 56). Be sure to get into role! This means setting up the interview ‘room’ appropriately as best you can, acting out the meeting and greeting at the start of the interview, and seeing the candidate out of the room at the end of the interview.

Role-play the first interview with post-interview feedback from the observer (15 mins):

Repeat the mock interview twice, rotating roles (30 mins)Rotate the rolesso that all members of the learning set get to play interviewer, interviewee and observer.

Possible interview questions

*NOTE: a question on dissertation / management report is required for everyone*

Education

  1. Tell me about your education background: why did you decide to study BA Business

Management/HRM/

Psychology?

  1. What is your research topic for your dissertation / management report and how is it relevant for the job you apply for?
  2. How is the process going? Are you ‘in control’ of the process of doing research and writing the dissertation / management report?
  3. Did you undertake a placement year? How is this experience relevant for the job you apply for?
  4. If you did not do a placement: what evidence could you provide of skills that you have gained from other work experiences?
  5. Are you planning any further study/training after you have graduated? Why/Why not?
  6. Which skills do you most need to develop further? How do you generally plan to do this?

Previous Work Experience

  1. Can you give me a brief summary of your work history to date?
  2. What were the exact responsibilities you had in each of these jobs?
  3. Can you give an example of where you have needed to provide leadership in a team?
  4. Tell me about when you witnessed conflict in a work or team environment? What was your role and how was the situation resolved?
  5. Give an example where you have taken responsibility for a difficult task.
  6. Describe an incident in which your action was critical for the solution of the problem.
  7. Give examples of your communication skills and how you have used and developed them in practice.

Current Application

  1. Why have you applied for this post?
  2. Why do you want to work for this company?
  3. What specific skills/competences do you have for this job?
  4. Why do you want this job?
  5. How do you see your career development in the long-term?
  6. What do you see as the next step in your career?
  7. What is your ideal job?
  8. Why should we offer you this position?
  9. Why do you want to change jobs?
  10. Describe an example where you have utilised your communication skills to handle a difficult customer (or co- worker, team member, etc.)?

Personal

  1. Describe how you would adapt to new situations, people, workplaces and ways of working?
  2. Give an example of your experience as a team player and how you have handled group conflicts.
  3. Give an example of how you approach new challenges.
  4. Give an example where you have led a team to reach a group objective and demonstrated your leadership skills.
  5. What are your main strengths and weaknesses?
  6. What is your greatest achievement to date?
  7. Give an example where you have provided good customer service (or team work).

Observer Role

As an observer attempt to observe the following in the interview:

  • information: how relevant is the information provided from both sides – interviewer and interviewer
  • are the questions leading or do they open up the potential for a proper dialogue?
  • How much are both sides willing and able to listen?

Other aspects that may be observed:

  • gestures and the way people sit opposite from each other
  • clarity of speech and appropriateness of answering: not too long and not too short
  • referring back to other information provided in the interview and linking skills with experiences Observer’s notes
Observer:
Interviewer:
Candidate:

Write some specific comments that will be useful for improvement and reinforcement – at least one positive (+) and one change, or delta ( )

Please tick box (5 = Excellent; 4 = Good; 3 = Average/Fair; 2 = needs improvement; 1 = poor).

General appearance, punctuality & presentation54321
Listening and answering skills (how much evidence provided and preparedness to address questions adequately)54321
Understanding of job role(interpretation of the job description and tasks required)54321
Suitability to job role (ability to link previous/existing experience to job role)54321
Level of competency-based answers (ability to understand question, give clear structured examples)54321
Level of responding to abstract questions (e.g. strengths, weaknesses, why should we recruit you? Etc.)54321
Awareness of and evidence of research on company culture and sector54321
Gestures, non-verbal signs and actions showing suitable attitude (e.g. avoiding irritating noises and movements)54321
Clarity of answers (tone, level, clarity)54321
Closing of interview: final question by interviewee54321

ACTIVITY 5.2: DISCUSSION OF INTERVIEW EFFECTIVENESS

An interesting dilemma about selection interviewing is that is relatively ineffective as a selection tool (i.e. as a predictor of the performance of the candidate in the job role), yet it continues to be used pervasively in organisations. Below is a summary of the main lessons gained from academic research about the reasons for widespread ineffectiveness and bad practice in selection interviewing.

Source: Bratton, J. and J. Gold (1999), Human Resource Management: Theory and Practice, 2nd Edition, Basingstoke: Macmillan (p.204).

As a group, discuss the following questions (10 mins):

1.How useful has this mock interview exercise been for you personally as a soon-to-be graduate jobseeker? What are the main lessons you have learnt about best practice as an interviewee and as an interviewer?

In general, how effective are interviews for both the candidate, and for the employer?

Tips for answering interview questions:

Remember to use the STAR framework:

Situation: Explain the situation

Task: Explain your task or role

Action: What action did you take?

Results: What resulted from your action?

Additional reading:

You may find this article by Steve Rock (2014) useful graduate jobs on how to stand out in an interview and impress employers.

ACTIVITY 5.3: BRIEFING FOR ‘THE BOARDROOM PROJECT’ (MOCK
ASSESSMENT CENTRE)

Take 10 minutes as a group to go over this with your module tutor.

In the next and final Tutorial session (The Boardroom Project) you and your learning set will be required to deliver a 10-minute team presentation, in a given time slot, to external guests from a friendly employer.

This type of exercise is common in assessment centres. Other assessment centre exercises are likely to include psychometric testing (e.g. verbal and non-verbal reasoning tests), interviews and role-plays. The team presentation, to a brief given at short notice, is designed specifically to test candidates’ leadership, team-working, communication, research, creativity and problem-solving skills. It also tests candidates’ ability to work under pressure.

Presentation Brief:

The exact brief will be released exactly two weeks before ‘The Boardroom Project’ presentations. This gives all students ample time to prepare, although under some time pressure. (In case you think this is unfair or tough, normally in assessment centres you are only given an hour to research and prepare your presentation!).

Your team will have 10 minutes maximum in which to present your research and creative ideas. You are to use a maximum of 5 PowerPoint slides. You are required to use a USB memory stick (no downloading of slides from the internet or your network account on the day please). The first slide must contain your team members’ names and ID numbers. You must reproduce your slides in Part 3 of your Portfolio (see below 5.4). Your team will be expected to take questions after the presentation. You are expected to dress smartly.

Presentation slot:

Your date, room and time slot for The Boardroom Project will also be published on Moodle. Presentations will take place one team at a time, using the normal tutorial rooms, at 15-minute intervals. On the day itself, please arrive 10 minutes before your scheduled time and wait quietly outside your classroom until you are invited in.

Presentation Feedback:

Our guest colleagues will give some immediate verbal feedback after your presentation. Each team member will also receive written feedback for inclusion in Part 3 of your Portfolio (see below 5.4). This will be distributed before the end of term (see below 5.4).

Prize-giving:

Our guest colleagues will be providing the written feedback and awarding prizes to the best presentations. The prize-giving event will take place at the beginning of Term 2, and details will be confirmed by the module leader.

ACTIVITY 5.4: REQUIREMENTS FOR PART 3 OF THE PORTFOLIO

Below are the requirements for Part 3 of the Portfolio, with some additional guidance in italics.

Based on the activities from Workshops 3, 4 and 5, discuss as a group what has been learned and what more needs to be done in order to address the requirements of Part 3. (10 mins)

Part 3: Job Search Activity (approx. 1000 words)

  • My SMART future career plan
    1. Reflect on how you would manage your job searching efforts and strategy and produce a SMART career plan that includes your short, medium and long-term goals over the next 5 years. You might want to use the template overleaf. (There is extensive literature on job search that you could use in support of your reflection).
  • (Mock) job application (Letter of application and Curriculum Vitae for a real vacancy)
    1. The job you apply for should link with your industry research in Part 1.
    2. Reproduce the job ad in the portfolio, citing its source, along with the LOA/personal statement and CV. You will need to provide evidence showing that a professional has reviewed and commented on at least one of these documents).
  • Reflection on (mock) interview (3 interviews, reflection on roles as interviewee, interviewer and observer, and how feedback was given to one another)
    1. Reflect on the experience of being an interviewer, interviewee and observer, and in particular on giving and receiving feedback. How did feel? What did you learn about your own interview technique? How useful was it to play the three roles?
    2. More generally, what did you learn about best practice in interviewing and the effectiveness of selection interviews? And what did you learn about giving and receiving feedback?(There is substantial academic literature on these questions, which you should refer to and cite).
  • Reflection on (mock) assessment centre
  • What did you learn from the experience of working with others, researching, preparing and delivering the mock assessment centre? What were the main points of feedback you received from the panel?
  • Include the written feedback and your slides in the Portfolio (as appendices if you wish).

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