Management Case Research and Analysis

Assignment 3 (Management Case Research and Analysis)
Jason Williams, Blair Kimber, Callum Fitzhardinge, Tim Shelley et al.
This case study shows how SPC, a food brand, increased sales by quickly reacting to a food
scandal hitting Australia and putting local farming families at the front of their campaign.
• Due to a batch of contaminated imports, Australia was experiencing a Hepatitis outbreak, fuelling
nationwide alarm about country-of-origin food labelling.
• The brand decided to increase the impact the country of origin has at the moment of purchase, by
featuring thousands of real farming families in most of its products’ labels, alongside with the
farmers’ and products’ history.
• It featured a branded campaign film launched at a key sporting event and played on national TV
networks, alongside POS placements, PR initiatives, social media and owned and earned media
branded content dissemination.
• Market share reached 24%, and weekly sales volumes grew 26% above the objective.
VIDEOS
Campaign Video: SPC Goulburn Valley: #MyFamilyCan – How a humble can
empowered millions of Australians
Watch Video 1; Video 2; & Video 3 (in assessment support pack).
Campaign details
Brand: SPC/Goulburn-Valley/Ardmona
Brand Owner: SPC Ardmona
Lead Agency: Leo Burnett Melbourne, Studio Pancho
Contributing Agency: Slingshot Media
Country: Australia
Industries: Fruit & vegetables
Media Channels: Content marketing, Online video, Packaging & design, Point-of-purchase, instore, Social media, Television, Word of mouth, advocacy
Budget: Up to 500k
Executive Summary
Due to a batch of contaminated imports, Australia was experiencing a Hepatitis outbreak, fuelling
nationwide alarm about country-of-origin food labelling.
While the nation debated, Australia’s largest fruit processor and cannery went to extraordinary
lengths to express the Australian origin of its products. Starting at the heart of the issue – product
labelling – we overhauled SPC’s iconic suite of brands (SPC, Goulburn Valley and Ardmona) to
galvanise the nation with an initiative called #MyFamilyCan.
We dedicated SPC’s iconic advertising real estate to Australian farming families, converting four
million cans into four million conversation starters in every major Australian supermarket, and
igniting a nationwide conversation around labelling.
Initially intended to be a fruit promotion, #MyFamilyCan quickly left its mark on society. Due to
an overwhelming response, a rerun was ordered within two days, and the redesigned labels have
now become a permanent fixture across the entire SPC range.
The success of #MyFamilyCan demonstrates the power of authenticity to resonate with
consumers. Twelve weeks on from the campaign, the Prime Minister unveiled new labelling
legislation to affect all products manufactured in Australia – a massive win for the countless
Australians who showed their support – both at the supermarket shelf and online.
Market Background and Objectives
A 100-year-old company was under threat
SPC is a proud, 100-year-old Australian business that has been a part of Australian life for a long
time. Everybody grew up with SPC in their pantries. It’s a much-loved Australian brand, up there
with Vegemite.
As the largest fruit processer in Australia, SPC employs thousands of workers in regional
Victoria. However, this iconic brand and the thousands of families that depend on it were under
serious threat.
SPC was being pushed out of the market
The challenge facing SPC originated beyond Australian borders. Major foreign exporters were
found by the Anti-Dumping Commission to be selling their products in Australia for 26% less
than their value, pushing SPC out of the market. In the absence of legislative protection, it was
proving too difficult to compete.
Despite being part of Aussie family life for over one hundred years, consumers were easily
tempted away from SPC by lower competitor prices, regardless of their origin. Our local origin
was failing to motivate people’s purchasing behaviour. Understandably this had a painful knockon effect for SPC sales and profitability.
A Hepatitis outbreak triggered alarm
An unexpected set of circumstances provided an opportunity for SPC. A contaminated batch of
competitor brand Nanna’s frozen berries (owned by Patties) caused a Hepatitis outbreak, sparking
widespread alarm about country of origin food labelling.
“For too long people have been talking about country-of-origin food labelling, and nothing much
has changed.” Tony Abbott, Prime Minister of Australia.
At a time when Australians were extremely sensitive about what they were feeding their families,
we deliberately set out to draw the nation into a food labelling conversation.
Empowering the everyday Australian decision makers
While the Government deliberated and the category resisted change, our strategic communications
challenge was to empower Australian consumers by enabling them to make informed shopping
decisions much more easily. In doing so, it was our intention to rally the nation around an
initiative that would drive a significant shift in behaviour.
Two defensive objectives were set
To take on cheap imports that were challenging SPC’s business and profitability at a fundamental
level, we needed to defend SPC’s position in the market. Specifically, we needed to:
1. Maintain market share at 20%iv.
2. Maintain weekly sales volume at 314,875 units, without resorting to discounting. In
addition to holding our ground from a business perspective, we needed to grow SPC’s
relevance from a brand perspective. Specifically, we needed to:
a. Grow the brand conversation by generating 100,000 social interactions during the
two-month campaign. The two-month period before the campaign saw 15,201
social interactions – our ambitious goal was to increase this by 558%.
Insight and strategic thinking
Putting people at the heart of the strategy
SPC is a cradle-to-grave family brand. Many Australians had SPC in their home kitchens as
children and have continued the tradition as they’ve grown up and have families of their own.
They make up the greatest buyer segment and have the greatest affinity for the brand.
Our core target audience, therefore, was young Aussie families right across the country, defined as
parents of children aged less than eleven years old, making up 21% of the total population. With
traditional nuclear households declining in Australia, these families had become increasingly
harder to reach.
What they all share is a juggling act, continually balancing nutrition, taste and convenience when
it comes to food for their kids. In a fast food world, they really do care about what goes in their
children’s mouths and where their food comes from.
Uncovering the relationship between food origin, power and purchase motivators for Aussie
families
71% of Australians agree that it is important to know where your food has come from. Why?
Because this knowledge gives them power; the power to choose quality ingredients, the power to
choose sustainably sourced foods and the power to support local farmers. The intrinsic link that
people make between the origin and the quality of food however, whilst strong, is not strong
enough alone for people to always choose SPC at the shelf. Why? Because price has a 70%
impact on grocery choices at the shelf, compared to only 25% for the food’s origin. Whilst
Australian origins resonated with people’s food values, they did not give them the monetary value
they needed at the point of purchase to put SPC in their baskets.
Making the shelf the battleground
Given that we could not reduce the price of SPC, we needed to increase the impact that Australian
origin would have on people’s choice at the shelf. Crucially, we needed to present it in a new way
that would dial up people’s motivation to choose SPC. To do this, we turned the shelf into the
battleground and gave the initiative a purpose beyond packaging design. Our strategy was to
champion SPC farmers in a way that would create an emotive connection with shoppers, strong
enough to encourage them to buy Australian produce and strengthen their brand trust enough that
they would willingly pay a premium for it.
By connecting Australian families with the families who grow their food, we unlocked a potent
emotional bond that resonated around Australia. It created a behavioural and conversational
reaction that spread from supermarkets to social media.
Implementation, including creative and media development
In the wake of the frozen berry scandal, SPC went to extraordinary lengths to show where their
food is from. Focusing on the heart of the issue – the labelling – we overhauled their iconic suite
of brands (SPC, Goulburn Valley and Ardmona) to galvanise the nation with an initiative called
#MyFamilyCan.
We dedicated SPC’s most valuable real estate to farming families, converting four million cans
into four million conversation starters in every major Australian supermarket.
Consumers no longer needed to scour fine print to find food they could trust. They instinctively
reached for authentic faces that went home to millions of households and ignited a nationwide
food labelling conversation.
To stimulate the conversation, we launched a deeply moving branded film. Building off the film’s
momentum, we placed families at the forefront of SPC’s social media assets. For the first time,
SPC brand logos were stripped from social channels and replaced with farmers’ faces – a simple
gesture that spoke volumes in the labelling debate.
To cement the #MyFamilyCan legacy, we honoured the families that showed support online by
dedicating a real tree in the farmers’ orchards – their very own ‘family tree’ – which will grow SPC
fruit for generations to come.
The campaign needed to be conversational and authentic, in order to stay true to SPC’s locally
focused brand DNA. As a result, we utilised influencer outreach in order to gain positive support
and discussion at a grassroots level. Distributing emotive branded content through owned and
earned channels invited real-time responses and gave rise to local influencers, triggering a surge
of support from Australian families that quickly spread online.
To amplify exposure, we screened the launch film at one of the nation’s key sporting events of the
year, the ANZAC Day Australian Football League match, which was subsequently played on
national TV networks, complemented by PR and nationwide POS (including over 100 off location
displays).
In a deliberate strategy, the cans drove the content. They went into millions of households and
fuelled a nationwide debate with the real family stories around each can. Suddenly Australians
were passionately discussing food labelling and proudly supporting farming families. At every
point, the hashtag #MyFamilyCan was designed to be a two-way interaction that drove our
marketing objectives.
Media used
Performance against objectives
The My Family Can campaign exceeded market share objectives by 20%
Initially intended to be a short-term promotion, #MyFamilyCan quickly left its mark. Due to the
overwhelming response a rerun was ordered within days, and it has now become a permanent
fixture across the SPC range.
As a result, we not only defended SPC’s position in the market; we strengthened it. Market share
reached 24%, surpassing our original objective by 20%x.
My Family Can transcended sales volume objectives by 26%
With one million SPC Family Cans sold in first month alone, weekly sales volume grew to
395,850 units, 26% above our objective.
My Family Can social interactions were eleven times greater than the set objective
Our third object – to grow the brand conversation, generating 100,000 social interactions with the
campaign – was greatly surpassed. The campaign generated 1.2 million direct social interactions.
That’s eleven times greater than our initial target. During the campaign, the online video received
3.7 million views, which is twenty-one times above the industry average. As a result, SPC became
the number one Australian FMCG brand for engagement, not bad for a total campaign expenditure
under AU$360,000.
12 weeks on, the Prime Minister unveiled new labelling legislation, making company-of-origin
labelling compulsory for all products manufactured in Australia – a massive win for the countless
Australians who showed support online.
It is in social media where this initiative struck a chord. #MyFamilyCan gave Australian families
a connection they’d never had before with farming families, and an even deeper connection with
the SPC brands. SPC had the top three performing posts in the category that quarter, and the
launch post had 915 interactions for every 1000 fans. The next closest competitor (Pepsi) had 72xx.
As a result, SPC became the #1 Australian FMCG brand for engagement.
#MyFamilyCan began to change the way Australian families thought about food labelling. The
new labels transformed the routine purchase of packaged fruit into a highly emotional decision.
No longer merely cans of fruit, these cans became a beacon for Australian-grown produce.
With this emotional packaging platform, #MyFamilyCan empowered millions of Australians and
sparked nationwide labelling change. All with a humble can.
Discounting other factors
1. Heightened competitor activity
In a bid to benefit from the momentum of My Family Can, both of the major Australian
supermarkets, Coles and Woolworths, dropped the price of their private label variants by
25%. These price reductions were promoted with mass market, above the line
communications. This made our challenge so much greater, as we needed to persuade
already price-sensitive shoppers to pay an even greater premium.
2. No promotions or discounts
No SPC products were discounted, not even by a cent. We could not rely on price cuts to
get people’s attention at the shelf and drive a sales uplift. We needed to find a way to
justify SPC’s price premium that would convert even the most highly price-sensitive
shoppers, who were choosing the cheaper competitors.
3. No change to distribution
During the campaign period, SPC’s distribution did not increase, not even by a single
store. SPC products continued to be available at the same number of Australian retailers.
We could not widen our net to capture a greater pool of shoppers. We had to convert those
already shopping at retailers that stocked SPC yet were choosing competitor brands.
4. No greater share of shelf
SPC’s share of shelf granted by the retailers did not increase during the campaign. SPC
products had the same number of shelf facings, which in many stores, were fewer than
cheaper, imported competitors and in a less desirable position than private label, i.e.
bottom of shelf and below shoppers’ natural line of sight. SPC had to work harder than
cheaper brands that had greater media budgets to capture shoppers’ attention at the
supermarket shelf.
5. No other SPC marketing activity
During the campaign period, no other SPC brand campaigns were active in the market. We
could not rely on any momentum built by other brand activity. We needed to create a
significant impact with our campaign alone.
6. Limited media expenditure
As a company who only recently faced the threat of total closure due to ongoing declining
sales, SPC did not have the luxury of big media budgets. With a tight budget to support not
one, but three of SPC’s brands (SPC, Goulburn Valley and Ardmona), we needed to make
every dollar create enormous impact.
Lessons learned
When a business faces an unprecedented set of commercial and political circumstances, an
unprecedented response is required. Overhauling a suite of iconic brands by replacing nationally
recognised packaging with unfamiliar faces demands great faith in the people and families who
represent your brand story. Having the courage to replace brand logos with the farmers can make
a humble can powerful enough to drive meaningful and positive change.
ROI
Gross profit has been calculated using an indicative category profit margin provided by SPC.
The campaign generated an ROI of 254%. $2.54 in gross profit for every $1 spent.
i. The Guardian, February 2014

Assignment 3 (Management Case Research and Analysis)
Jason Williams, Blair Kimber, Callum Fitzhardinge, Tim Shelley et al.
This case study shows how SPC, a food brand, increased sales by quickly reacting to a food
scandal hitting Australia and putting local farming families at the front of their campaign.
• Due to a batch of contaminated imports, Australia was experiencing a Hepatitis outbreak, fuelling
nationwide alarm about country-of-origin food labelling.
• The brand decided to increase the impact the country of origin has at the moment of purchase, by
featuring thousands of real farming families in most of its products’ labels, alongside with the
farmers’ and products’ history.
• It featured a branded campaign film launched at a key sporting event and played on national TV
networks, alongside POS placements, PR initiatives, social media and owned and earned media
branded content dissemination.
• Market share reached 24%, and weekly sales volumes grew 26% above the objective.
VIDEOS
Campaign Video: SPC Goulburn Valley: #MyFamilyCan – How a humble can
empowered millions of Australians
Watch Video 1; Video 2; & Video 3 (in assessment support pack).
Campaign details
Brand: SPC/Goulburn-Valley/Ardmona
Brand Owner: SPC Ardmona
Lead Agency: Leo Burnett Melbourne, Studio Pancho
Contributing Agency: Slingshot Media
Country: Australia
Industries: Fruit & vegetables
Media Channels: Content marketing, Online video, Packaging & design, Point-of-purchase, instore, Social media, Television, Word of mouth, advocacy
Budget: Up to 500k
Executive Summary
Due to a batch of contaminated imports, Australia was experiencing a Hepatitis outbreak, fuelling
nationwide alarm about country-of-origin food labelling.
While the nation debated, Australia’s largest fruit processor and cannery went to extraordinary
lengths to express the Australian origin of its products. Starting at the heart of the issue – product
labelling – we overhauled SPC’s iconic suite of brands (SPC, Goulburn Valley and Ardmona) to
galvanise the nation with an initiative called #MyFamilyCan.
We dedicated SPC’s iconic advertising real estate to Australian farming families, converting four
million cans into four million conversation starters in every major Australian supermarket, and
igniting a nationwide conversation around labelling.
Initially intended to be a fruit promotion, #MyFamilyCan quickly left its mark on society. Due to
an overwhelming response, a rerun was ordered within two days, and the redesigned labels have
now become a permanent fixture across the entire SPC range.
The success of #MyFamilyCan demonstrates the power of authenticity to resonate with
consumers. Twelve weeks on from the campaign, the Prime Minister unveiled new labelling
legislation to affect all products manufactured in Australia – a massive win for the countless
Australians who showed their support – both at the supermarket shelf and online.
Market Background and Objectives
A 100-year-old company was under threat
SPC is a proud, 100-year-old Australian business that has been a part of Australian life for a long
time. Everybody grew up with SPC in their pantries. It’s a much-loved Australian brand, up there
with Vegemite.
As the largest fruit processer in Australia, SPC employs thousands of workers in regional
Victoria. However, this iconic brand and the thousands of families that depend on it were under
serious threat.
SPC was being pushed out of the market
The challenge facing SPC originated beyond Australian borders. Major foreign exporters were
found by the Anti-Dumping Commission to be selling their products in Australia for 26% less
than their value, pushing SPC out of the market. In the absence of legislative protection, it was
proving too difficult to compete.
Despite being part of Aussie family life for over one hundred years, consumers were easily
tempted away from SPC by lower competitor prices, regardless of their origin. Our local origin
was failing to motivate people’s purchasing behaviour. Understandably this had a painful knockon effect for SPC sales and profitability.
A Hepatitis outbreak triggered alarm
An unexpected set of circumstances provided an opportunity for SPC. A contaminated batch of
competitor brand Nanna’s frozen berries (owned by Patties) caused a Hepatitis outbreak, sparking
widespread alarm about country of origin food labelling.
“For too long people have been talking about country-of-origin food labelling, and nothing much
has changed.” Tony Abbott, Prime Minister of Australia.
At a time when Australians were extremely sensitive about what they were feeding their families,
we deliberately set out to draw the nation into a food labelling conversation.
Empowering the everyday Australian decision makers
While the Government deliberated and the category resisted change, our strategic communications
challenge was to empower Australian consumers by enabling them to make informed shopping
decisions much more easily. In doing so, it was our intention to rally the nation around an
initiative that would drive a significant shift in behaviour.
Two defensive objectives were set
To take on cheap imports that were challenging SPC’s business and profitability at a fundamental
level, we needed to defend SPC’s position in the market. Specifically, we needed to:
1. Maintain market share at 20%iv.
2. Maintain weekly sales volume at 314,875 units, without resorting to discounting. In
addition to holding our ground from a business perspective, we needed to grow SPC’s
relevance from a brand perspective. Specifically, we needed to:
a. Grow the brand conversation by generating 100,000 social interactions during the
two-month campaign. The two-month period before the campaign saw 15,201
social interactions – our ambitious goal was to increase this by 558%.
Insight and strategic thinking
Putting people at the heart of the strategy
SPC is a cradle-to-grave family brand. Many Australians had SPC in their home kitchens as
children and have continued the tradition as they’ve grown up and have families of their own.
They make up the greatest buyer segment and have the greatest affinity for the brand.
Our core target audience, therefore, was young Aussie families right across the country, defined as
parents of children aged less than eleven years old, making up 21% of the total population. With
traditional nuclear households declining in Australia, these families had become increasingly
harder to reach.
What they all share is a juggling act, continually balancing nutrition, taste and convenience when
it comes to food for their kids. In a fast food world, they really do care about what goes in their
children’s mouths and where their food comes from.
Uncovering the relationship between food origin, power and purchase motivators for Aussie
families
71% of Australians agree that it is important to know where your food has come from. Why?
Because this knowledge gives them power; the power to choose quality ingredients, the power to
choose sustainably sourced foods and the power to support local farmers. The intrinsic link that
people make between the origin and the quality of food however, whilst strong, is not strong
enough alone for people to always choose SPC at the shelf. Why? Because price has a 70%
impact on grocery choices at the shelf, compared to only 25% for the food’s origin. Whilst
Australian origins resonated with people’s food values, they did not give them the monetary value
they needed at the point of purchase to put SPC in their baskets.
Making the shelf the battleground
Given that we could not reduce the price of SPC, we needed to increase the impact that Australian
origin would have on people’s choice at the shelf. Crucially, we needed to present it in a new way
that would dial up people’s motivation to choose SPC. To do this, we turned the shelf into the
battleground and gave the initiative a purpose beyond packaging design. Our strategy was to
champion SPC farmers in a way that would create an emotive connection with shoppers, strong
enough to encourage them to buy Australian produce and strengthen their brand trust enough that
they would willingly pay a premium for it.
By connecting Australian families with the families who grow their food, we unlocked a potent
emotional bond that resonated around Australia. It created a behavioural and conversational
reaction that spread from supermarkets to social media.
Implementation, including creative and media development
In the wake of the frozen berry scandal, SPC went to extraordinary lengths to show where their
food is from. Focusing on the heart of the issue – the labelling – we overhauled their iconic suite
of brands (SPC, Goulburn Valley and Ardmona) to galvanise the nation with an initiative called
#MyFamilyCan.
We dedicated SPC’s most valuable real estate to farming families, converting four million cans
into four million conversation starters in every major Australian supermarket.
Consumers no longer needed to scour fine print to find food they could trust. They instinctively
reached for authentic faces that went home to millions of households and ignited a nationwide
food labelling conversation.
To stimulate the conversation, we launched a deeply moving branded film. Building off the film’s
momentum, we placed families at the forefront of SPC’s social media assets. For the first time,
SPC brand logos were stripped from social channels and replaced with farmers’ faces – a simple
gesture that spoke volumes in the labelling debate.
To cement the #MyFamilyCan legacy, we honoured the families that showed support online by
dedicating a real tree in the farmers’ orchards – their very own ‘family tree’ – which will grow SPC
fruit for generations to come.
The campaign needed to be conversational and authentic, in order to stay true to SPC’s locally
focused brand DNA. As a result, we utilised influencer outreach in order to gain positive support
and discussion at a grassroots level. Distributing emotive branded content through owned and
earned channels invited real-time responses and gave rise to local influencers, triggering a surge
of support from Australian families that quickly spread online.
To amplify exposure, we screened the launch film at one of the nation’s key sporting events of the
year, the ANZAC Day Australian Football League match, which was subsequently played on
national TV networks, complemented by PR and nationwide POS (including over 100 off location
displays).
In a deliberate strategy, the cans drove the content. They went into millions of households and
fuelled a nationwide debate with the real family stories around each can. Suddenly Australians
were passionately discussing food labelling and proudly supporting farming families. At every
point, the hashtag #MyFamilyCan was designed to be a two-way interaction that drove our
marketing objectives.
Media used
Performance against objectives
The My Family Can campaign exceeded market share objectives by 20%
Initially intended to be a short-term promotion, #MyFamilyCan quickly left its mark. Due to the
overwhelming response a rerun was ordered within days, and it has now become a permanent
fixture across the SPC range.
As a result, we not only defended SPC’s position in the market; we strengthened it. Market share
reached 24%, surpassing our original objective by 20%x.
My Family Can transcended sales volume objectives by 26%
With one million SPC Family Cans sold in first month alone, weekly sales volume grew to
395,850 units, 26% above our objective.
My Family Can social interactions were eleven times greater than the set objective
Our third object – to grow the brand conversation, generating 100,000 social interactions with the
campaign – was greatly surpassed. The campaign generated 1.2 million direct social interactions.
That’s eleven times greater than our initial target. During the campaign, the online video received
3.7 million views, which is twenty-one times above the industry average. As a result, SPC became
the number one Australian FMCG brand for engagement, not bad for a total campaign expenditure
under AU$360,000.
12 weeks on, the Prime Minister unveiled new labelling legislation, making company-of-origin
labelling compulsory for all products manufactured in Australia – a massive win for the countless
Australians who showed support online.
It is in social media where this initiative struck a chord. #MyFamilyCan gave Australian families
a connection they’d never had before with farming families, and an even deeper connection with
the SPC brands. SPC had the top three performing posts in the category that quarter, and the
launch post had 915 interactions for every 1000 fans. The next closest competitor (Pepsi) had 72xx.
As a result, SPC became the #1 Australian FMCG brand for engagement.
#MyFamilyCan began to change the way Australian families thought about food labelling. The
new labels transformed the routine purchase of packaged fruit into a highly emotional decision.
No longer merely cans of fruit, these cans became a beacon for Australian-grown produce.
With this emotional packaging platform, #MyFamilyCan empowered millions of Australians and
sparked nationwide labelling change. All with a humble can.
Discounting other factors
1. Heightened competitor activity
In a bid to benefit from the momentum of My Family Can, both of the major Australian
supermarkets, Coles and Woolworths, dropped the price of their private label variants by
25%. These price reductions were promoted with mass market, above the line
communications. This made our challenge so much greater, as we needed to persuade
already price-sensitive shoppers to pay an even greater premium.
2. No promotions or discounts
No SPC products were discounted, not even by a cent. We could not rely on price cuts to
get people’s attention at the shelf and drive a sales uplift. We needed to find a way to
justify SPC’s price premium that would convert even the most highly price-sensitive
shoppers, who were choosing the cheaper competitors.
3. No change to distribution
During the campaign period, SPC’s distribution did not increase, not even by a single
store. SPC products continued to be available at the same number of Australian retailers.
We could not widen our net to capture a greater pool of shoppers. We had to convert those
already shopping at retailers that stocked SPC yet were choosing competitor brands.
4. No greater share of shelf
SPC’s share of shelf granted by the retailers did not increase during the campaign. SPC
products had the same number of shelf facings, which in many stores, were fewer than
cheaper, imported competitors and in a less desirable position than private label, i.e.
bottom of shelf and below shoppers’ natural line of sight. SPC had to work harder than
cheaper brands that had greater media budgets to capture shoppers’ attention at the
supermarket shelf.
5. No other SPC marketing activity
During the campaign period, no other SPC brand campaigns were active in the market. We
could not rely on any momentum built by other brand activity. We needed to create a
significant impact with our campaign alone.
6. Limited media expenditure
As a company who only recently faced the threat of total closure due to ongoing declining
sales, SPC did not have the luxury of big media budgets. With a tight budget to support not
one, but three of SPC’s brands (SPC, Goulburn Valley and Ardmona), we needed to make
every dollar create enormous impact.
Lessons learned
When a business faces an unprecedented set of commercial and political circumstances, an
unprecedented response is required. Overhauling a suite of iconic brands by replacing nationally
recognised packaging with unfamiliar faces demands great faith in the people and families who
represent your brand story. Having the courage to replace brand logos with the farmers can make
a humble can powerful enough to drive meaningful and positive change.
ROI
Gross profit has been calculated using an indicative category profit margin provided by SPC.
The campaign generated an ROI of 254%. $2.54 in gross profit for every $1 spent.
i. The Guardian, February 2014

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